Have You Read The Good Friday Agreement


“I didn`t sit down and started at the beginning and went through,” Raab replied. “But of course, at different points in the negotiations, when issues were raised, it was an important opportunity to look at the different aspects very carefully.” Nice reference, I think for Boris, it`s a case of “You`ve never gone crazy without power? It`s boring, no one is listening to you” As the tragedy of Brexit reaches its end of the season, most people across Britain are starting to hear what we Irishmen have been shouting for over two years: that the success of this great act of national sabotage is inseparable from northern Ireland`s complications. The vague wording of some provisions, called “constructive ambiguities”[8], helped to secure acceptance of the agreement and postpone debate on some of the most controversial issues. These include paramilitary dismantling, police reform and the standardisation of Northern Ireland. The MP testified on Wednesday morning before the Northern Ireland Affairs Committee. Asked if he had read the text in its entirety, he said: “Not like a novel, we sit down and say: `Do you know what about the holidays? It`s a tight read.” The agreement reached was that Northern Ireland was part of the United Kingdom and would remain so until a majority of the population of Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland wanted something else. Should this happen, the UK and Irish governments will be required to “have a binding commitment” to implement this decision. “Failure to abide by previous agreements would fundamentally undermine its credibility in international diplomacy – how could a country trust them?” Ms Felton continued: “A flagrant violation of international law would have a considerable impact on how Britain is perceived internationally. Lady Hermon began to say, “So you confirm that you have not read the Belfast Agreement” before it was interrupted by Mr Raab. The previous text has only four articles; It is this short text that is the legal agreement, but it incorporates the last agreement into its timetables. [7] From a technical point of view, this draft agreement can be distinguished as a multi-party agreement, unlike the Belfast Agreement itself. [7] As part of the agreement, the British and Irish governments undertook to hold referendums in Northern Ireland and the Republic on 22 May 1998.

The referendum in Northern Ireland is expected to approve the deal reached in the multi-party talks. The referendum in the Republic of Ireland should approve the Anglo-Irish Agreement and facilitate the amendment of the Irish Constitution in accordance with the Agreement. . . .